Perspectives

Perspectives showcases articles about the trials and triumphs of implementing science-based treatment at home, school, or in the community. We invite parents and professionals to submit real-world reports, challenges, large and small victories, progress and stumbling blocks in finding or providing quality care and education for people with autism.

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Overview

There are a number of internet forums that enable members of the public, both parents and professionals, to share their experiences surrounding the diagnosis, treatment and ongoing progress of a child with autism. Perspectives is another such venue; however, this forum will host contributions that reflect ASAT’s mission and guiding values as outlined below:

ASAT’s Mission: Our mission is to promote safe, effective, science-based treatments for people with autism by disseminating accurate, timely, and scientifically sound information; advocating for the use of scientific methods to guide treatment; and combating unsubstantiated, inaccurate and false information about autism and its treatment.

ASAT’s Guiding Values: ASAT is committed to science as the most objective, time-tested and reliable approach to discerning between safe, effective autism treatments, and those that are harmful or ineffective. ASAT supports all scientifically sound research on the prevention, treatment and cure of autism, as well as all treatments for autism that are shown to be effective through solid scientific research, regardless of discipline or domain.

Guidelines

The ASAT Forum solicits a variety of voices from many domains. We encourage submissions from parents, caregivers, and professionals.

Content: Our intent is to solicit and consider submissions on a wide variety of autism-related topics, and these may include discussions of biomedical or behavioral research; day to day life with a child, adolescent or adult with autism; individual case histories of people who have been diagnosed with autism, comments about emerging research, etc. It is important to note, however, that while we support legitimate inquiry into promising areas of research, we recognize that autism treatment has been fraught with unsubstantiated fads and dubious treatments. Therefore, we are particularly interested in those submissions that demonstrate an understanding of how science should inform intervention for autism. We do not encourage submissions that advocate for treatments that have not been empirically verified as effective.

Tone: We are interested in civil discussion of autism-related issues, so that we may all continue to expand our understanding of how to help children and adults with autism. We will not publish or respond to submissions that contain flaming rhetoric or personal attacks. Submissions may be scholarly or personal in both tone and language.

Permissions/copyrights: Submissions should be the intellectual property of the submitting author: Do not include any copyrighted material without the proper attributions or permissions. Research articles or summaries of recent research should reference the appropriate sources.

Editorial Review: Submissions to Perspectives will be selected by ASAT’s Editorial Review committee. Any submission chosen for publication may be further edited, although no edited piece will be published without the author’s final approval. From time to time, the editors may solicit commentary on particular themes or topics as they become relevant.

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Articles
  • Malcom’s Tiles - Through the interview with Dr. Corley, we follow Malcolm’s steps that led him to a place where he developed the skill sets necessary to create and successfully operate such a unique business that represents one of his passions....
  • Spelling Bee Victory Fortunately, that simple accommodation led to several other students’ participation....
  • A Mother’s Perspective Recently, ASAT learned of material posted on the Web written by Michelle Dawson. While it is not ASAT’s usual policy to address every opinion on the Web that we find objectionable, fallacious, or dangerous...
  • From grief to giving Melissa “Missy” Moyer of Sunbury, PA, was, among many things, a champion for autism. Working as a personal care aide in a local school with a child on the autism spectrum...
  • Facing The Future With Serenity What does the future hold for him? What kind of person will he be? What will his life and our lives be like? What kind of relationship will he share with his brother? What will he be when grows up?...
  • Looking Ahead I was flipping through recently developed photographs looking, as I usually do, for the pictures that stand out. I’m always looking for those special images that capture a precious expression, a beautiful face or a special memory...
  • Mainstream and Hope? My colleague Mark Steege, PhD, coined a phrase to describe the typical process of the education of children with autism in public schools: “mainstream and hope.”...
  • Meeting The Needs Of The Whole Child I am aware of five children with autism who have died tragically in the last year: three died in fire, and two drowned after slipping out of the home unnoticed...
  • What Autism Awareness Should Be About Autism Awareness Day will soon come to a close. The blue puzzle pieces will disappear from Facebook pages and billboards, the media will focus their attention on other topics of interest, and we will return to business as usual. And business as usual is not OK...