Script/Script Fading Procedures

Description: Scripts are verbal statements in either written or in an audio format. An individual is taught to repeat the script in appropriate specific social situations (e.g., “At the park I play on the slide.”). As individuals learn to use the scripts, they are faded, typically one word at a time, from end to beginning (e.g., “At the park I play on the ____”).

Research Summary: Studies indicate that script/script fading procedures are effective in teaching verbal initiations to peers, social interactions, and conversation skills to individuals with autism.

Recommendations: Script/script fading procedures are effective teaching procedures for individuals with autism in increasing a variety of skills.

Selected References:

Selected scientific studies:

Krantz, P.J., & McClannahan, L.E. (1993). Teaching children with autism to initiate to peers: Effects of a script-fading procedure. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 26, 121-132.

Krantz, P.J., & McClannahan, L.E. (1998). Social interaction skills for children with autism: A script-fading procedure for beginning readers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 31, 191-202.

Stevenson, C.L., Krantz, P.J., & McClannahan, L.E. (2000). Social interaction skills for children with autism: A script-fading procedure for nonreaders. Behavioral Interventions, 15, 1-20.

Sarokoff, R.A., Taylor, B.A., & Poulson, C.L. (2001). Teaching children with autism to engage in conversational exchanges: Script-fading with embedded textual stimuli. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 81-84.

For additional information:

McClannahan, L.E., & Krantz, P.J. (2006). Teaching conversation to children with autism: Scripts and script fading. Bethesda, MD: Woodbine House.